Monday, February 4, 2019

PTSD
Have you said to yourself “Holy cow, my horse is crazy right out of the blue”?
Has it become down right dangerous to ride, and do not know when its coming?
Over the years I have worked with hundreds of traumatized horses, most of whom have suffered so much emotional and mental trauma some form or another. The amount of stress endured during the traumatic event affects the release of certain hormones that are responsible for creating the "flight or fight" response to stress. When horses have endured a very traumatic experience and are exposed to chronic stress, their normal feedback system (healthy release of adrenaline, chemicals) breaks down, just as ours does, leading them to experience PTSD.
The hippocampus, a horseshoe-shaped structure, is part of the limbic centre and is involved in several bodily functions including storing and retrieval of new memories and emotional responses. During a traumatic event, both Adrenaline and Cortisol are released into the body to prepare us for fight or flight. They are necessary for our survival. However, if these hormones remain in high concentration over an extended period, they become toxic to the hippocampus, damaging and destroying cells, proven in MRI-brain scans.
Horses suffering from PTSD have endured so much stress and constant adrenaline, they remain in a chemically-induced state of self-preservation where both Adrenaline and Cortisol are released in large amounts. This is damaging on a chemical and emotional level. Neurologically the horse continues to release hormones that “trigger” them into constant fight and flight. This leaves them emotionally unbalanced as they cannot differentiate between what’s really happening and what has triggered a memory. When this occurs, the horse becomes hyper-vigilant, distrustful, unreachable. The encouraging thing is you can. Simply back off and help your horse overcome this debilitating neurological disorder with certain exercises. With a lot of time, understanding and patience, that do NOT encourage pain or fear.
by: Katherine Barbarite of Whispering Hooves
www.whisperinghooves.com

Monday, August 22, 2016

Posture& Position
Just ask yourself, how is your posture? Am I positioned on the horse to cause extra weight on areas not necessary or even pain? Is your horse very forehanded or even racy when asked to move out, or even downright uncomfortable?
The questions are endless, and incorrect posture can promote uneven uses of the horse's natural movement and structure, as well as you, the rider.
The term that is used for many years "shoulder hip and heel" has been taught to ma...ny equestrians, is a term we should consider revisiting
No human or living being is born perfect or at equal parts. Some have tilted hips , shorter legs on one side, or simply one side is larger than the other. This makes it almost impossible to make the above term perfectly workable.
With understanding of the human to horse mechanics it comes down to this, positioning yourself on your seat bones allow the vertebra to straighten. Allow your legs to go long with a slight give at the knee, so your toes can pin out causing your heel to naturally drop. In conclusion, you actually feel a lengthening of your body allowing yourself to be in the center core of the horse, that's where you should be!
By Katherine Barbarite of Whispering Hooves
Www.whisperinghooves.com

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Proper Position
Have you pondered and scratched your head wondering why your horse seems edgy, irritable, uncomfortable?
Maybe even when tacking up they dont stand still and pin ears? Better yet, wont move forward or they refuse going into transitions?
Proper position of the saddle is the answer. Pinching and restraining the scapula (shoulder), with the bars of a saddle will have the horse display discomfort out loud. Try to be aware and place the saddle bars at least one finger back off the scapula, so it allows freedom of movement without pain. From Katherine Barbarite of Whispering Hooves
Www.whisperinghooves.com


Thursday, February 11, 2016

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Whispering Hooves: The Missing Art of Horsemanship by Katherine Barbarite

Whispering Hooves:
The Missing Art of Horsemanship
by
Professional Horse Trainer and Riding Instructor
Katherine Barbarite

Available in Paperback! Buy now!

Whispering Hooves:
The Missing Art of Horsemanship

Whispering Hooves: The Missing Art of Horsemanship is a comprehensive educational tool of Katherine’s methods for horses and clients. These are the same methods she demonstrates at expos and workshops…

“Partnership & Confidence Building Horsemanship”

*Instructional Trail Riding  *Clinics  *Workshops 
*Horse training (behavior to mechanics)

*Riding Lessons Western& English  *Demonstrations
*Leadership programs  * 2-5 day Private Inclusive  *At your facility or mine

Katherine teaches a straight forward set of exercises that aides in the development of a calm confident horse and rider. No matter the skill level or discipline, these steps remove fear and resistance, elevating trust, communication and bond. Understanding the importance of herd structure and leadership to enhance safety and promote growth. Earn why bad timing and poor releases lead to unhappy and ridged horses. Most of all, “become more than a passenger, become a partner.”

Katherine expounds…
Through years of being captivated by and passionate about horses, and with determination to break into the barriers of horse training, I have studied and worked with many horse trainers.  I have put an intense amount of time working with horses and people, trying to find a way for both to come together in order to communicate and bond, creating a partnership. To align a happy, safer horse and rider no matter what level or riding discipline. I am a true believer in "Partnership & Confidence Building Horsemanship". It is a method of educating the horse and rider without using brute force, but instead using a take and give format - communicating in a language they understand.

In 1996 I began working in local barns voluntarily dedicating time, and doing anything I could from mucking stalls to assisting veterinarians and farriers. Then in 2000 I started to help run and work at guest ranches, teaching people and horses how to find and work through issues and problems before they find them. In 2004 I began to live out my true passion and I traveled across country working with "problem" horses helping to desensitize them and have them overcome their fears and issues. I often admit it’s caused from humans or human made "issues".

I teach everyday with the methods to form a safer foundation, help me reinforce how important ground work is before you can get up on a horse.
In 2006, I set up my first clinic in Jamesville New York. While working the floor I watched clients go from uncertainty to confidence in a short period of time. It was exhilarating and a great success. Also, I had the opportunity to help run and teach a clinic in Fraser Colorado. Over the summer of 2006, with horses and people at a guest ranch in Granby Colorado and was in charge of horses, clinics and riding instruction. I worked with guests from all over the world teaching them one on one, about the importance of ground work and how to better improve their riding and relationship with their horse.

The most memorable experience was an 8 and 10 year old who attended one of my riding and instruction clinics. Now they have a foundation and are creating their own future with horses in England. I worked with horses that some long time "cowboys" claimed to be unridable and irrational making them suitable for guest ranch work. They are now being ridden by guests, as young as 8 years old, by using a method that I call "Partnership& Confidence Building". With my life dream now being pursued, I had the opportunity to work with over 1000 horses, making them safer for clients, guests and as well as the workers at the ranch. Now these horses and people ride and enjoy each other more safely.

Currently, I am working with people in order to help them understand that communication and working with such a majestic and powerful animal is not difficult and need not be rocket science.

Early spring of 2007 finally broke through, with determination of helping people learn feel technique, observation, and being the horse's advocate, drove to accomplish becoming a Certified Horseman’s Association Riding Instructor in English and Western; at the same time ultimately receiving the honor of being recognized as a Certified Horse Trainer with the Frank Bell's program. With these incredible accomplishments under belt, the quest for knowledge, experience, listening and understanding all horses, ability to heighten CONFIDENCE and communication. Without delay and much interest from the public, in May of 2010 I was asked to demonstrate as a Featured Clinician for many Expo events all over the country. August being a wonderful time of year, I decided to pack a horse and dedicate a two day 70 mile track upstate New York. I went from Jamesville, New York to Camillus, New York passing towns, villages, people, stores, and wonderful country. I camped out with the horses at the 9 mile creek. The Horses were great and looking forward to more miles. As of the recent, the ongoing journey of teaching the "Missing Art of Horsemanship" of training persists here in my home of New York, as well as throughout the country performing demonstrations at many expos.

About Katherine…
International Equine Presenter and Lecturer: Certified Horse Trainer w/Frank Bell / Certified Horseman’s Association

Riding Instructor (Western & English)

Featured in: Trail Rider Magazine, Phoenix Times, Tito Times (Costa Rica), The Times Independent (Moab Utah), Syracuse Times (NY), Performance Horse Digest, Tri-State Horse, Country Folks Mainstream, Trail Blazer Magazine.

Clinician/Demonstrator:
NE Equine Expo, Equine Affaire, Islip Horseman’s Assoc., East End Livestock Horseman’s Assoc., National Day of the American Cowboy (NY), Malibu Dude Ranch (PA), Kay El Bar Ranch (AZ), King Mountain Ranch (CO), White Stallion Ranch (AZ), De La OSA (AZ), Sunrise Farm (MD), Las Cascadas (MX), Barking Horse Farm (Costa Rica), Rancho Tranquillo (Costa Rica), Todd Mountain Ranch (BC) Cimarron Ranch (NY), RoseWal Farm (Gilboa, NY), Horse World Expo (PA), Equifest (NY), Saratoga Horse Expo (NY), Certified Horsemanship Association International Conference (NY),Tombstone Monument Ranch (AZ), Quiet Creek Stables (NY), Northfolk Stables (NY). NY Horse Center (NY).

"Connect with the Mind and the Feet will Follow.” - Katherine Barbarite

"Ask...Wait...Give for Results.” - Katherine Barbarite

Saturday, March 23, 2013

Meet n' Greet


Meet n’ Greet

After demos, I am often swarmed by attendees wanting the same special connection they saw me share with horses.  Often, I’m asked ‘how can I develop a better relationship with my horse?’

For starters, I ask people to remember horses’ most natural instincts, those of prey animals.  We look different, smell funny, sound unusual, and just might be mountain lions.  Our equine partners need us to prove we are not predators but that we are their nurturing leaders.    

Horses live what they learn.  If we burst into the stall, reach immediately for their head, rush to throw something on their back, that’s INVASION.  Doing so you have now taught your horse that invasion is okay.   

Whoa, back to kindergarten friends.  Let’s start, as horses do, with a regular INTRODUCTION.  Horses in the pasture, the wild, or the barn generally touch another’s nose when meeting for the first time giving an ‘international handshake’.  I suggest you mimic horses’ social order accordingly.  ASK to say a simple ‘Hello’.  Yes, that simple.  Just offer your closed hand palm down about an inch or two in front of their nose.  WAIT for them to touch your hand.  Patience is necessary! If they don’t, back up, take a breath, and offer the introduction again.  Once touched, GIVE back the reward of a soft stroke.  You have just begun your first conversation in the language they understand. Access granted. This practice should continue anytime you greet a horse, first time, all the time.

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Backing

Have you even found yourself overwhelmed with frustration trying to back a horse? Pulling with your hands to encourage the movement? The more pressure you add, the more the horse either raises there head high up and plants their feet? Feel like you can pull the bit through their mouth without any flowing movement? Proper groundwork is the answer, not the motion in the saddle first. Helping the horse understand what you are looking for with proper use of balance and their body, to set them up for success when asked. Remember a hollow back and high head can cause injury and resistance where a lowered rounded head and a lifted back gets the job done freely.